Painstaking Work: Carl Fabergé, Mark Rothko and Me

To say that it’s a while since I last updated my blog is a drastic understatement.  I last piped up during the gloomy month of November.  It’s now February.  It’s still gloomy and it’s still raining.  But as to the reason for my apparent absence  –  I could talk of Christmas, of trips to Abu Dhabi, of the pressures of work at the inception of a new term  –  but all these would pale into insignificance as compared to the main issue at hand, which is far more interesting and far more artistic in nature.

Since resolving, almost exactly one year ago, to leave behind my old, score based, traditional, tonal and essentially Romantic style of composition for a new, fresh sound, realised exclusively using a digital/electronic format, I have found that the compositional process is inordinately slower and more time consuming than ever before.  Before, if you had asked me to complete a movement for full orchestra in the space of 4 weeks, I would have met the deadline with relative ease.  The tried and tested ways of working would have been immediately employed and put to work.

I think this familiarity with one’s own method of working, together with the structure of sonata form, which imposed a kind of helpful discipline upon composers of the Classical period, aided the proliferation of copious works in a short space of time by these composers.  The removal of these structures, strictures and “familiar friends” (as an artist friend of mine calls them) leaves the composer somewhat at sea  –  possibly with only a map and compass instead of radar.  There is almost total freedom nowadays  –  except one now has to chart one’s own course!

The other reason for my failure to produce work quickly is explained by the procedures which I now employ in my compositional work.  The music is essentially comprised of the layering of sound; the overlapping of chords and sounds which cross-fade in and out of one another, producing new and interesting harmonies as more layers are added.  These layers themselves are somewhat complicated and intricate and are comprised of further layers within them.  Needless to say, the work is slow and complex.

In the world of art, I liken this process to the painstaking work undertaken at the workshops of Carl Fabergé, where his legendary enamelling work necessitated the layering of several coats of enamel  –  a delicate and highly skilled process which few other makers mastered.  This created the beautiful iridescent effect for which Carl Fabergé’s enamelling became famous.

Another example is the so called “colour field paintings” of Mark Rothko in which he used several original techniques which he kept secret even from his own assistants but which UltraViolet analysis now reveals not only the various layers of the paintings but also the techniques and materials used.  This is a good example of art which appears simplistic to the untrained eye, yet belies an inner complexity and mastery of process.

Despite the pressures of daily life as well as the time consuming processes involved in my current compositional work, I have now managed to complete another short movement in my series of works inpsired by the Imperial Fabergé eggs  –  this time dedicated to the Diamond Trellis Egg.

I am currently adding the final touches to this and will let you hear it very soon.

Pictured below:  White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose) by Mark Rothko; Green enamel cigarette case by Carl Fabergé

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One Memorable Day

I think most people would agree that however glamorous one’s life may be (or may not be), one day really does roll into the next for the most part.  But then there are those days which one will remember forever.  I had such a day yesterday.  Given my current fascination with the work of Carl Fabergé it was a rare privilege to be invited by Geoffrey Munn (of the BBC Antiques Roadshow) to see items of Fabergé he has at the London shop, Wartski.  Wartski has been famous over the decades, not only for supplying beautiful things to the rich and famous, but also for being the main dealer in England for important and rare items of Fabergé.

Naturally, I was shown quite a number of beautiful objects of vertu and every item I saw was exquisite in its own way  –  but there were highlights! One was a large aquamarine and diamond brooch (pictured below), an engagement present from Nicholas II to Princess Alix of Hesse, and known to have been taken from the Empress just before she and her family were shot on July 17th, 1918.  I held it in my hands as Geoffrey recounted the brooch’s illustrious heritage and its place in history.  Another was one of the treasures Geoffrey showed me which was not by Fabergé  –  a splendid tiara, set with a number of large sapphires and numerous brilliant diamonds (pictured below).  This was a gift from Prince Albert to Queen Victoria.  Queen Victoria is even pictured wearing this very tiara (or coronet, as she referred to it) in a painting by Henry Richard Graves of 1874.  I held it carefully in my hands for as long as five minutes, spellbound by the knowledge that I was touching a very special piece of history as well as an extremely beautiful object.

Geoffrey was kind and generous  –  and gave me his undivided attention for a whole hour.  Days like this are never forgotten.  My visit to Wartski has also re-doubled my passion for Fabergé and I am now working full steam ahead on the next movement of my Fabergé Suite, dedicated to the Diamond Trellis Egg.

Diamond and Aquamarine Brooch

Queen Victoria Sapphire Coronet

The Tsar, Fabergé and the Russian Rebel Spirit

The_Coronation_Egg

A little while ago I said that I wanted to compose a suite of pieces inspired by some of my favourite Fabergé eggs. I have now completed the first movement of this suite which is based on the Imperial Coronation Egg  –  arguably the most famous of these eggs, commissioned by Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and made by Fabergé in 1897.

The Imperial Coronation Egg is one of the most sumptuous and unapologetically luxurious eggs made by Fabergé. The egg itself is made of gold and decorated with translucent lime-yellow enamel on a guilloché field of starbursts. The decoration is in reference to the cloth-of-gold robe worn by the Tsarina at her coronation. The egg is trellised with bands of greenish gold laurel leaves mounted at each intersection by a gold imperial double-headed eagle enamelled in opaque black and set with a rose diamond in its chest. This pattern is also drawn from the coronation robe worn by the empress. A large portrait diamond is set in the top of the egg within a cluster of smaller brilliant diamonds.

As we all know, the Fabergé eggs always contained an enchanting surprise within. The “surprise” in this case is an exact replica of the imperial coach which carried the Tsarina Alexandra to her coronation at Uspensky Cathedral. Made in gold, platinum and strawberry guilloché, it is crafted in intricate detail.

I am predominantly inspired by the visual qualities of this most beautiful work of art. The coalescence of a superlative quality of workmanship together with the use of the most expensive and luxurious materials of gold, platinum and diamonds make this, for me, both a feast for the visual sense as well as an inspiration in terms of musical texture and sound. I have attempted to replicate in sound and musical texture the resplendence of this egg and the surprise contained within it. I have enjoyed experimenting with sounds which are new to me with such evocative names as “Orbital Pad” and “Glacier Point”, often dovetailing the sounds as one would do the flutes and clarinets orchestrally.  I have also experimented here, as I did in my last composition, “Gold I”, with a sort of micro-canon produced by layering a Sibelius audio file with a midi file placed into Cubase. The Sibelius audio file begins playback a split second later than the midi file, creating a sort of micro-canon which creates a texture I like somewhat. Central to the composition is the quotation of fragments of a melody from music that most is recognisably Russian – the opening bars of “Pictures at an Exhibition”, by Mussorgsky.

Although predominantly inspired by the visual beauty of this egg, one cannot cast totally from one’s mind the historical and political context in which these eggs were made and gifted. It is no accident that these eggs were made of the most expensive materials known to man and that so much expense was lavished in their creation. The Fabergé eggs have, for many people I think, come to symbolise the obscene wealth of the Romanovs and of the prevailing social inequality of the time.  The opening music in this composition alludes to an impression in my mind of the coronation procession itself. In my mind’s eye I see the coronation coach and the crowds lining the streets (listen out for the sound of horses hooves, used incidentally as much for their rhythmic properties as their representational value). The music is suggestive of imperial power but also has an undercurrent of discontent and a hint of the eventual downfall of the tsar. Who could have foreseen that not twenty years after this coronation procession revolution would break out on the streets of Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) and Tsar Nicholas II would be forced to abdicate his throne? Further still that the entire Romanov family would be executed a year later, in 1918?

The Russian Revolution of 1917 is an example of what historians in this field refer to as a “bunt”. A Russian bunt is basically defined as social pressure not relived by peaceful actions, finally triggering a self-destructive revolution. It is said that Tsar Nicholas II missed opportunities to prevent his downfall because he allowed the tsarina to blind his judgement and paralyse his will. One timely gesture from the tsar might have saved Russia and changed the course of history. The time came when even the tsarina herself saw “the writing on the wall”, so to speak” – but it was too late. As Rodzianko, president of the Duma, said himself at the time, “It is too late to talk concessions; it is time to abdicate.”

The Russian revolution of 1917 has been the only opportunity in modern times for this kind of “bunt” – but one wonders about the eventual fate of President Putin.  There is a history in Russia of high approval ratings for leaders until suddenly, without much warning, the leader is quickly brought down by revolution. There is a theory that the reason Putin has avoided this fate thus far is because he himself, in his actions on the world stage, has taken on the persona of the Russian rebel, with such moves as the annexation of the Crimea, thus subduing the rebel spirit of the people which might otherwise express itself in more self-destructive ways.

All these thoughts feed into this first movement of my Fabergé Suite, thus making it as much an expression of thought about the present as of the past. But I think it is also important to say that, despite the association the Fabergé eggs have with the extreme wealth of the Romanov dynasty and the inequality of the time, I think we can allow ourselves, in 2015, to enjoy their aesthetic beauty in abstract from their historical context.

My next challenge is the composition of the final movement (the inner movement will be composed last) inspired by the Trans-Siberian Railway Egg, and I am working on this now.

Back to School

It’s eight o’ clock on one of those chilly September mornings reminiscent of that “back to school” feeling of bygone days.  I’m sitting, once again, in my Krispy Kreme “office” watching the grammar school boys pass on their way to school, glad in the knowledge that I’m not among them (I hated school!).

Time seems to have accelerated during these final weeks of holiday from my piano teaching, and whilst I’ve enjoyed my time away from the pressures of a rigorous timetable, progress on the compositional work has been somewhat slow.  Ironically, it’s only now that I’m back to work that my creativity seems to have been jump-started into action.  Incredibly, I’ve also now started work on my annual accounts  –  a task which is never embarked upon without considerable procrastination.

There seems to be a perverse “law of time” which says that “the more you do, the more you do”, or conversely, “the more time you have available the less you achieve”.  I have noted this “law of time” in action over years of teaching adults to play the piano.  The students who achieve the most by far are the CEOs, the surgeons, the business men and women.  Those for whom time is in generous supply rarely progress as far as they themselves would like.

With such an industrious start to the autumn term I can be sure of making good progress with my compositional work in this latter part of the year.  I have begun the composition of a small suite of pieces directly inspired by the beautifully ornate Fabergé Imperial  Easter eggs.  I have chosen five of my favourite eggs and a short movement will be composed for each.

The first of these is possibly the most famous  –  the Imperial Coronation Egg.  I am currently in the midst of completing this first movement and I shall reveal the results of this quite soon.