Oranges and Lemons

orangeslemons2

We’ve all heard of the nursery rhyme “Oranges and Lemons”, but few of us know the true meaning behind the words.  The first published record of the song dates back to 1744 but there is also reference to a square dance bearing the same name in a 1665 publication.  The longer version of the rhyme conjures up an image of 16th and 17th century London where each district is synonymous with a particular trade.  For instance, St Clement’s was associated with the nearby wharf where merchants landed citrus fruits  –  hence, oranges and lemons.  Money lending is also at the heart of the rhyme  –  or, more pointedly, those who are indebted to others and are unable to pay (“When will you pay me say the bells of Old Bailey”).  The rhyme ends with the chilling words: “And here comes a candle to light you to bed, And here comes a chopper to chop off your head”.  The great tenor bell of St Sepulchre’s Church, near the Old Bailey, would toll at 9am on a Monday morning, signalling the start of any hangings due to take place that week.

I decided that I wanted to compose a piece about the little song which would incorporate the sounds of the bells of St Clement Danes, in London  –  but if I were to do so it would have to use an actual recording of the bells themselves, and this is exactly what you hear in the extract below.

The recording of the bells has been manipulated and transposed as desired and the bell sounds are interspersed with over-lapping chords which create poly-chordal harmonies.  This over-lapping of chords and the resulting poly-chordal harmony has become an important feature of my newly acquired compositional style which is always still developing.

I hope you’ll enjoy the extract from “Lemons; St Clements”, below.  If you’re on a laptop this music is best heard through either a good set of speakers or through headphones in order to really appreciate the intricacies of the sound:

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